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Keep your eyes safe this Halloween!

Keep your eyes safe this Halloween!

Halloween is an exciting holiday for children and adults alike. Fun costumes, scary movies, deliciously spooky snacks… what’s not to love? This Halloween, Larson Eye Care encourages our community to practice safe and healthy habits. Below, check out some of these eye safety tips for Halloween as recommended by the American Optometric Association! Bring a flashlight If you’re trick-or-treating at night, don’t forget your flashlight! Dark pathways and uneven sidewalks don’t mix. Flashlights will also make children more visible to drivers. Don’t wear loose-fitting costumes Costumes that drag on the ground may cause you (or the people surrounding you!) to trip. Make sure that scarves, ties,...

September is Healthy Aging Month

September is Healthy Aging Month

It’s never too late to take care of your vision! September is Healthy Aging Month, an annual health observance designed to encourage people to start healthy habits and increase their physical, social, financial, and mental wellbeing. “We saw a need to draw attention to the myths of aging, to shout out ‘Hey, it’s not too late to take control of your health, it’s never too late to get started on something new,’” said Carolyn Worthington, the editor-in-chief of Healthy Aging Magazine and the creator of Healthy Aging Month. This September, Larson Eye Care encourages our patients to practice healthy vision habits. Check them out below! Schedule a comprehensive dilated eye exam When was...

Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month! This month, Larson Eye Care is answering common questions parents have about their children’s eye health. When should children receive their first eye exam? Parents should have their children’s eyes examined during well-child visits starting at around age three. During this exam, your child’s eye doctor will look for refractive errors (nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism), as well as other common childhood eye conditions like amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (crossed eyes), ptosis (drooping eyelid), and color deficiency (color blindness). If you notice any warning signs that your child has vision problems, there’s no need to...