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What are common causes of blurry vision?

What are common causes of blurry vision?

Have you been experiencing blurry vision lately? Step away from WebMD and try not to panic – there are many normal reasons why you may be experiencing this mild visual disturbance. Below, we’ve outlined some of the more common causes of blurry vision. You need to get glasses – or update your prescription. Do you wear glasses or contacts? If not, you might need to start. Although most people develop nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism when they’re younger, your eyes are constantly changing. If you already wear glasses, it might be time to update your prescription! You need reading glasses. If you’re older than 40 and find it difficult to read menus, newspapers, or other small print, it might be time for reading glasses. Presbyopia, or the diminished ability to focus on close objects, is a common and natural part of aging.Reading glasses and bifocals aren’t the only way to treat presbyopia – there are also surgical options such as corneal inlays and monovision LASIK. You’re pregnant. It might sound farfetched, but the hormonal changes associated with pregnancy can alter the shape and thickness of your cornea, making your vision blurry. Dry eyes are another common culprit for blurry vision during pregnancy. Although blurry vision is relatively common during pregnancy, it’s important that you report it to your doctor. In some cases, it could indicate gestational diabetes or high blood pressure. You’re experiencing side effects from a medication. Have you started...
Why are My Eyes Dry? A Brief Introduction to Dry Eye.

Why are My Eyes Dry? A Brief Introduction to Dry Eye.

Dry eye is a common condition, affecting at least 6.8 percent of the U.S. adult population. If you’ve been experiencing dry, scratchy eyes lately, you might be one of them. Symptoms of dry eye include: A stinging, scratchy, or burning sensation in your eyesFeeling like something is stuck inside your eyesExcess watering, or tearingBlurred visionDifficulty wearing contact lensesIncreased sensitivity to lightEye redness These symptoms can vary from person to person and don’t necessarily predict the presence and severity of dry eye disease. If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, it’s important to talk to your ophthalmologist. So why are my eyes dry? Healthy eyes are constantly producing tears to keep themselves lubricated. When eyes fail to produce these tears – or produce the wrong kind of tears – dry eye symptoms can arise. There are multiple factors that can result in dry eyes. Aging Tear production often diminishes with age – in fact, most people over age 65 have at least some symptoms of dry eye. Hormones associated with menopause can also trigger the condition. Tear Quality Tears are composed of oil, water, and mucus. Oftentimes, people with dry eye disease have difficulties producing the water layer of their tears, resulting in tears that evaporate too quickly or fail to spread evenly over the cornea. Medications Medication can often influence the eye’s ability to make tears. Antihistamines, decongestants, oral contraceptives, blood pressure medications and...
Five New Year’s Resolutions for Health Vision

Five New Year’s Resolutions for Health Vision

It’s a new year! Have you figured out your resolutions yet? Below, we’ve listed five resolutions you can follow for better eye health. Which of these can you see yourself accomplishing in 2019? Wear sunglasses Sunglasses aren’t just a fashion accessory – they’re also an important way to protect your eyes from the sun’s harmful radiation. While most people understand that excessive sun exposure can be dangerous for skin, fewer are aware that UV rays can damage your vision as well.  According to the National Eye Institute, an estimated 20% of cataracts are caused by extended UV exposure. UV exposure may also increase the risk of developing macular degeneration (a serious eye disease that can result in blindness) or pterygium (a non-cancerous growth within the eye).  When you purchase sunglasses, make sure they block 99 to 100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B radiation. Other sunglasses might look nice, but they won’t protect your eyes. Wear protective eyewear If you plan to participate in any home improvement activities this year, protective eyewear is a must. Woodworking, glass cutting, and many other projects can result in flying debris that can become lodged in the eye. Welding goggles are necessary during metal-working to avoid retinal burns. When it comes to protective eyewear, accept no imitations. Most protective eyewear lenses are made from polycarbonate, a material that is 10 times stronger than other plastics. Regular glasses, swim goggles, and other...

What Should I Know About Snow Blindness?

Are you going skiing this winter? Snowboarding? Or do you plan to miss the cold weather entirely and spend the winter months on a beach somewhere, sipping a cold beverage and gazing out into the ocean? Regardless of your decision, Larson Eye Care would like to take this opportunity to discuss snow blindness, a painful condition that can arise when you spend too much time out in the snow – or, conversely, too much time on the beach. What is snow blindness? Snow blindness, a common form of photokeratitis, is a medical condition caused by overexposure to UV rays. People who develop snow blindness often spend several hours out in the snow without proper eye protection. Snow and ice can reflect UV rays into the eyes, resulting in a burned cornea. In fact, snow blindness is actually a form of sunburn. Despite the name, snow blindness can also result from UV lights reflected from sand or water. Tanning lamps, tanning beds, and arc welding can lead to the condition as well. What are the symptoms of snow blindness? Symptoms of snow blindness include: Eye pain Blurry vision Gritty sensation in eye Red eyes Increased sensitivity to light Headache Swollen eyes or eyelids Vision loss Just like other sunburns, snow blindness is not immediately painful. It may take several hours after UV exposure before symptoms appear. What is the treatment for snow blindness? Thankfully, snow blindness is a temporary condition and typically resolves itself within 24 to 48 hours. In the meantime, you can...
Five Eye-Healthy Thanksgiving Foods

Five Eye-Healthy Thanksgiving Foods

If you’re looking to cook a healthy Thanksgiving meal, look no further. Below, Larson Eye Care has outlined five foods – and over a dozen dishes – you can cook this Thanksgiving to benefit your vision. Cauliflower Cauliflower is packed with vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant that tends to be abundant in fruits and vegetables. Numerous studies have found that vitamin C can reduce the risk of developing cataracts, as well as slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration, or AMD. Cauliflower also contains omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids may protect eyes from AMD, dry eye syndrome, and glaucoma. For a healthier alternative to mashed potatoes, we recommend garlic mashed cauliflower. We also recommend roasted cauliflower steaks and truffled cauliflower gratin. Sweet potatoes Sweet potato, like cauliflower, is also an excellent source of vitamin C. In addition, it contains beta-carotene, a pigment that is converted into vitamin A in the body. When combined with other antioxidant vitamins, vitamin A may play a role in reducing the risk of vision loss in people with AMD. It may also reduce the risk of eye infections. Thankfully, this vibrant vegetable is already a staple in many people’s Thanksgiving dinners. Bake a sweet potato pie or try some roasted sweet potatoes with onions. Candied sweet potatoes are another excellent choice. Pumpkin Did you know that a serving of mashed pumpkin provides more than 200 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin A?...