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Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month! This month, Larson Eye Care is answering common questions parents have about their children’s eye health. When should children receive their first eye exam? Parents should have their children’s eyes examined during well-child visits starting at around age three. During this exam, your child’s eye doctor will look for refractive errors (nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism), as well as other common childhood eye conditions like amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (crossed eyes), ptosis (drooping eyelid), and color deficiency (color blindness). If you notice any warning signs that your child has vision problems, there’s no need to...

Keeping your eyes safe from fireworks

Keeping your eyes safe from fireworks

In the month surrounding the Fourth of July, an average of 280 people go to the emergency room each day with fireworks-related injuries. This July, Larson Eye Care encourages our community to take care when using backyard fireworks. Fireworks safety 101 Every year, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission publishes an annual report about fireworks-related injuries and deaths. Last year, fireworks were involved in five deaths and an estimated 9,100 injuries treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments. More than half of these injuries (62%) occurred between June 22ndand July 22nd.  Although people most frequently injure their hands (28% of all fireworks-related injuries) and...

Cataracts: Myths and Facts

Cataracts: Myths and Facts

June is Cataract Awareness Month! Every year, the organization Prevent Blindness America along with the American Academy of Ophthalmology encourages Americans to be mindful of the signs and symptoms associated with cataracts. This year, we’ve decided to outline several common myths about cataracts.  Have you heard any of these before? Myth: Cataracts only affect older adults Cataracts are most common in older adults, but it’s still possible to develop a cataract when you’re young. Factors like long-term steroid use, UV exposure, eye injuries, smoking, and diabetes can increase your risk of developing cataracts at any age. Myth: Cataracts are always visible Sometimes...